Support of Fritzbox 7530

#1

Hi, can somebody tell me how to get the bootlog of this device and the rest of procedure to get it supported for openwrt?

Thanks in advance!

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TP-LINK Archer VR200v | FXS and DECT support
#2

Developing support for it will be quite a challenge…

  • SoC, IPQ4019: supported
  • wlan, IPQ4019, supported
  • VDSL modem, Intel VRX518, not supported yet
    might be relatively similar to VRX2xx, but there will be considerable development necessary to get it working at all - and outside its natural habitat (married to a QCA ARMv7 SoC, rather than an all Intel/ lantiq SoC; also using little endian instead of big endian…)
  • FXS ports, same issue as with the VDSL modem - might be supportable, but it probably needs considerable porting and development efforts
  • DECT, unsupported - might not be impossible to add, but requires from-scratch development.

For the bootlog you'll need to identify and use the serial header - and hope that the vendor didn't cripple it.

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#3

Found this patch which could help with the VRX518 driver:


and this:

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#4

Hey fellas,

integration into OpenWrt has already been started at https://github.com/blocktrron/openwrt/tree/pr-fritz7530.

We are also in the process of requesting the GPL sources for the VRX518 driver that is not amongst the files already shared at http://osp.avm.de/fritzbox/fritzbox-7530/source-files-FRITZ.Box_7530-07.02.tar.gz.

Best regards

Martin

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#5

Hi everbody,

thanks for the answer!

@hexa
Very very nice!
Have you flashed a FB7530 already? :slightly_smiling_face:
If yes, did you flash over adam?

Thanks in advance!

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#6

We take the same approach as with the 4040. We put a UBoot image into the kernel partition which is loaded by EVA. We plan on using the already-present ubifs to store kernel & rootfs.

Regarding flashing: In contrast to e.g. the 4040 or 4020, EVA does not support writing to flash directly. You need to load an initramfs image and write the partitions from there (AVM uses this approach for their recovery.exe)

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#7

Thanks for the answer, could you please explain step by step how to perform the flash procedure ?

Thank you!

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#8

I will do as soon as i have some kind of state which i would recommend someone to flash. Currently it is pretty barebone in terms of what is working and the required U-Boot is currently in a sorcery state. It is completely WIP currently.

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#9

Ok, thank you very much! :slight_smile:
Just tell me an I‘ll test. :slight_smile:

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#10

I was just wondering if you already found the GPL sources for the fritzbox itself?
if not, here they are:
https://osp.avm.de/fritzbox/

and my mirror:

I havn't looked for the DSL driver yet, so maybe its not even in there.

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#11

There are great news.
blocktrron ported openwrt to the device :slight_smile:
There is no dsl driver yet!

THE FOLLOWING IS AT YOUR OWN RISK:

  1. Clone from here: https://github.com/blocktrron/openwrt/tree/pr-fritz7530-nodsl

  2. Download modfied ramboot script from here:
    https://paste.linuxlounge.net/#/rJFaI1ukX16hETwTuoNtPKHHvrY!hAx204NFzzIjbBx8dmoTgW2c7TtwbteeSdL43A6lL0c

  3. Compile the above branch from blocktrron

  4. Upload the uboot-fritz7530.bin with the modified ramboot script.

  5. TFTP to 192.168.1.1 in binary mode and upload the initrams image you just compiled

  6. Scp the uboot-fritz7530.bin and the squashfs image to 192.168.1.1:/tmp/

  7. SSH to 192.168.1.1

  8. Write uboot to boot0 partition:
    mtd write /tmp/uboot-fritz7530.bin /dev/uboot0

  9. Write uboot to boot1 parition:
    mtd write /tmp/uboot-fritz7530.bin /dev/uboot1

  10. Remove avm partitions to get space for owrt:
    ubirmvol ubi0 --name=avm_filesys_0
    ubirmvol ubi0 --name=avm_filesys_1

  11. Sysupgrade the squashfs you've uploaded to the device:
    sysupgrade /tmp/squashfs_image.bin

  12. OpenWRT should boot.

THANKS TO @blocktrron !!!

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#12

A little confusing as this device seems to be in the compatibility list now showing as "snapshot" but I can't actually find any image.

Are there any pre-compiled images now or do you still have to compile it yourself? I understand you would still have to do the procedure above to flash as AVM locked out flashing on these devices thus you have to boot a custom image from RAM first.

Has anyone tested how the WiFi performs on OpenWRT? I was kinda hoping this would be a nice replacement for my Archer C7 which seems to be CPU bound for large WiFi transfers.

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#13

https://downloads.openwrt.org/snapshots/targets/ipq40xx/generic/openwrt-ipq40xx-avm_fritzbox-7530-initramfs-fit-uImage.itb
https://downloads.openwrt.org/snapshots/targets/ipq40xx/generic/openwrt-ipq40xx-avm_fritzbox-7530-squashfs-sysupgrade.bin

Keep in mind that this doesn't imply that the VDSL modem, DECT or the FXS ports were supported.

1 Like

#14

Thanks, I understand DECT is likely never to be supported and VDSL is not guaranteed either.

I'm really just interested in more consistent 802.11ac performance than the Archer C7 while waiting for OpenWRT supported 802.11ax devices to come out (I bet that will be a while coming).

I think I will hold off trying until someone can confirm if performance is acceptable or not as I don't fancy trying to get stock firmware back on it if its not, if you even can.

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#15

I can only speak for a single Client 2SS <-> AP scenario, but i managed to get ~500Mbit/s to the LAN side. However, I can't speak for if it's worth the upgrade from a C7. From the raw WiFi speeds when directly near the device i had with neither of those devices any problems.

However, in case you consider buying one, i would go for the 4040. It has the downside of having less flash, but it sports an additional WAN port, additional USB 2.0 port but has the same core chipset. Way back to stock is relatively easy in case you have access to a Windows computer (on this device I've tested it personally, but i could try the same with the 7530 and report back if you wish).

The recovery tool can be obtained from AVM's FTP server: http://ftp.avm.de/

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#16

That's very promising.

I got the router free with my ISP for signing a new 12 month contract, which also was cheaper for the same package, so quite a steal.

My Archer C7 is not performing great. Here's a comparison of the Archer C7 OpenWRT vs the Fritzbox stock firmware:

Reverse mode, remote host lcars is sending
[  4] local 192.168.1.2 port 49810 connected to 192.168.1.253 port 5201
[ ID] Interval           Transfer     Bandwidth
[  4]   0.00-1.00   sec  31.5 MBytes   265 Mbits/sec
[  4]   1.00-2.00   sec  31.8 MBytes   265 Mbits/sec
[  4]   2.00-3.01   sec  32.1 MBytes   268 Mbits/sec
[  4]   3.01-4.00   sec  36.8 MBytes   311 Mbits/sec
[  4]   4.00-5.00   sec  35.0 MBytes   293 Mbits/sec
[  4]   5.00-6.00   sec  35.0 MBytes   294 Mbits/sec
[  4]   6.00-7.00   sec  40.0 MBytes   335 Mbits/sec
[  4]   7.00-8.00   sec  41.9 MBytes   352 Mbits/sec
[  4]   8.00-9.00   sec  41.1 MBytes   345 Mbits/sec
[  4]   9.00-10.00  sec  42.2 MBytes   354 Mbits/sec
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
[ ID] Interval           Transfer     Bandwidth       Retr
[  4]   0.00-10.00  sec   370 MBytes   310 Mbits/sec    5             sender
[  4]   0.00-10.00  sec   368 MBytes   308 Mbits/sec                  receiver

Reverse mode, remote host lcars is sending
[  4] local 192.168.1.2 port 49935 connected to 192.168.1.253 port 5201
[ ID] Interval           Transfer     Bandwidth
[  4]   0.00-1.00   sec  50.2 MBytes   421 Mbits/sec
[  4]   1.00-2.00   sec  51.6 MBytes   433 Mbits/sec
[  4]   2.00-3.00   sec  51.5 MBytes   432 Mbits/sec
[  4]   3.00-4.00   sec  52.8 MBytes   443 Mbits/sec
[  4]   4.00-5.00   sec  51.9 MBytes   436 Mbits/sec
[  4]   5.00-6.00   sec  51.1 MBytes   429 Mbits/sec
[  4]   6.00-7.00   sec  52.5 MBytes   441 Mbits/sec
[  4]   7.00-8.00   sec  52.0 MBytes   436 Mbits/sec
[  4]   8.00-9.00   sec  49.8 MBytes   418 Mbits/sec
[  4]   9.00-10.00  sec  49.8 MBytes   418 Mbits/sec
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
[ ID] Interval           Transfer     Bandwidth       Retr
[  4]   0.00-10.00  sec   516 MBytes   433 Mbits/sec    0             sender
[  4]   0.00-10.00  sec   513 MBytes   431 Mbits/sec                  receiver

iperf Done.

Even 2.4Ghz is dramatically different on the same channel and width:

Reverse mode, remote host lcars is sending
[  4] local 192.168.1.2 port 50623 connected to 192.168.1.253 port 5201
[ ID] Interval           Transfer     Bandwidth
[  4]   0.00-1.00   sec  3.92 MBytes  32.9 Mbits/sec
[  4]   1.00-2.00   sec  3.32 MBytes  27.8 Mbits/sec
[  4]   2.00-3.01   sec  3.73 MBytes  31.0 Mbits/sec
[  4]   3.01-4.00   sec  3.67 MBytes  31.1 Mbits/sec
[  4]   4.00-5.00   sec  3.42 MBytes  28.7 Mbits/sec
[  4]   5.00-6.00   sec  2.68 MBytes  22.5 Mbits/sec
[  4]   6.00-7.00   sec  3.61 MBytes  30.3 Mbits/sec
[  4]   7.00-8.00   sec  3.72 MBytes  31.2 Mbits/sec
[  4]   8.00-9.00   sec  3.89 MBytes  32.6 Mbits/sec
[  4]   9.00-10.00  sec  3.91 MBytes  32.8 Mbits/sec
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
[ ID] Interval           Transfer     Bandwidth       Retr
[  4]   0.00-10.00  sec  37.1 MBytes  31.1 Mbits/sec    0             sender
[  4]   0.00-10.00  sec  36.0 MBytes  30.2 Mbits/sec                  receiver

Reverse mode, remote host lcars is sending
[  4] local 192.168.1.2 port 50835 connected to 192.168.1.253 port 5201
[ ID] Interval           Transfer     Bandwidth
[  4]   0.00-1.00   sec  8.21 MBytes  68.8 Mbits/sec
[  4]   1.00-2.00   sec  8.31 MBytes  69.8 Mbits/sec
[  4]   2.00-3.00   sec  9.41 MBytes  78.8 Mbits/sec
[  4]   3.00-4.00   sec  9.72 MBytes  81.7 Mbits/sec
[  4]   4.00-5.00   sec  10.1 MBytes  84.5 Mbits/sec
[  4]   5.00-6.00   sec  9.46 MBytes  79.3 Mbits/sec
[  4]   6.00-7.00   sec  8.73 MBytes  73.2 Mbits/sec
[  4]   7.00-8.00   sec  9.15 MBytes  76.8 Mbits/sec
[  4]   8.00-9.00   sec  9.26 MBytes  77.5 Mbits/sec
[  4]   9.00-10.00  sec  9.25 MBytes  77.6 Mbits/sec
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
[ ID] Interval           Transfer     Bandwidth       Retr
[  4]   0.00-10.00  sec  93.0 MBytes  78.0 Mbits/sec    0             sender
[  4]   0.00-10.00  sec  91.7 MBytes  76.9 Mbits/sec                  receiver

I use custom scripts to aggregate a list of all connected clients, for security and to monitor range/connection issues, which is why if I can get that performance on OpenWRT then that would be great. I can repurpose the C7 on my friends cable line which is using an older WDR3600 that can't quite handle his full speed with QoS enabled.

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#17

You forgot the u-boot: https://downloads.openwrt.org/snapshots/targets/ipq40xx/generic/u-boot-fritz7530/uboot-fritz7530.bin

Also that folder has the uploader for the 4040 instead of the eva_ramboot.py so I took the latter from github.

Everything seems to have gone fine, just need to configure it now.

UPDATE:
Everything works fine from boot but if you try to restart WiFi you get the following error and 5Ghz never comes back up, you have to power cycle.

[ 1154.642701] ath10k_ahb a800000.wifi: peer-unmap-event: unknown peer id 0

Apart from that speed seems much more stable than the Archer C7 (Channel 52 80Mhz Reg: GB):

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