Tagging devices with buzzer / beeper

I noticed that we currently don't have a tag for a buzzer / beeper.

What is the first thing that comes to your mind when you see the encirceled part?
Is this a buzzer or a beeper?

grafik

  • Buzzer
  • Beeper
  • something else

0 voters

Depending on the votes I would then add a tag buzzer or beeper to the devices equipped with such a hardware feature.

Devices in the OpenWrt wiki with buzzer / beeper (any others?):

  • RB450G
  • RB450Gx4
  • RB750Gr3
  • devolo WiFi pro 1750e
1 Like

“Buzzer”, to me, is fixed tone. Apply power, it buzzes. “Beeper”, to me, requires a modulated signal.

Meh, the more I think about it, the less attached I become to any of them. Even "speaker" vs. "piezo transducer" doesn't cover it. Just pick one...

More possibilities:
"Speaker"
"Piezo"

It doesn't really matter, as long as it's consistent. Anyone looking for a device that can beep will soon find out what it's called in OpenWrt.

On wikidevi.com there is a flag 'buzzer'; 'speaker' is used for normal audio loudspeaker.

The Linux kernel module is pcspkr; the OWrt kernel module says 'beeper' (kmod-gpio-beeper). There isn't much consistency in other hardware – a quick look through motherboard manuals shows 'Speaker' and 'Buzzer' about even.

No wonder you wanted a vote! :wink:

I think I'd go with 'buzzer', just to be the same as wikidevi.

If you quickly switch power off and on and if you play with the pulse with this could also become a modulation. :smile:

Checking the number of search results for "piezo buzzer" vs "piezo beeper" speaks a rather obvious message in favour of buzzer.

That has historic reasons, originally x86 hardware had a real pwm controlled speaker - only after soundcards became prevalent (and onboard), these were replaced by cheaper (mostly-) single purpose buzzers.

Whee, an off-the-rails discussion on semantics! I'm in!

So here's the low down:

Speaking in an EE context, what is known as "buzzers" can only make one specific tone. They are driven by an internal oscillator, you only need to apply a set voltage. They "buzz" on their own.

"Speakers" (colloquially also "beepers" or "tweeters") can make any sound, their oscillation is driven by an external circuit. (x86 has always done this using PWM, and will always do this, if only to be able to make two sounds that differ in tone height.)

Whether it is piezo or magnetic driven is not relevant in this context, although one tends to speak of "beepers" for piezo speakers because they lend themselves much more to single beeps.

"Beeper" would be the best choice, if only to stay consistent with kmod-gpio-beeper. Also not every "beeper" is a "buzzer", but every "buzzer" is a "beeper." And "speaker" should remain reserved to proper loudspeakers.

[Edit: Paragraph removed due to unavailability of the "sarcasm" font, no doubt an error in the forum's stylesheets.]

This topic is 3 days old.

For the fun of it:

What makes buzzing / humming sounds?
A transformer (50/60Hz) https://youtu.be/Nc8Rwj3e0gc?t=73
A hummingbird (75Hz) https://youtu.be/0vgRYTPV9qU?t=3
A bee (200Hz) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KG8f-EV8vDo

What makes beeping sounds?
A Katydid https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_aRZXNAxrVM
A Cockatiel https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DjD5pBZVVUY
A Red-Winged Blackbird https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lf3KPqQdVF8

OpenWrt forum: 7 buzzers / 2 beepers
aliexpress: 31.000 buzzers / 1500 beepers (incl. pagers)
google: 65.6E10 buzzer / 5.45E10 beeper (incl. pagers)

Since the whole world (OpenWrt forum, google, aliexpress) thinks that a piezoelectric sound converter which makes sounds in the kHz range is called a buzzer, we will call it the same in the wiki.