Refactoring home network

I think any managed switch supports VLANs. Not much to understand, really... if you want network segragation like a guest zone and lan zone and maybe even an IoT zone, you use VLANs.

This is not correct. The GS308T supports VLANs with both stock and OpenWrt. As darksky says, any managed switch will.

I like having the same interface and OS (OpenWrt) on all my home equipment. I am also paranoid and do not trust that stock firmware will not "phone home" with my usage statistics or automatically update itself to something that makes OpenWrt harder to install later. Sometimes there are options to opt-out of these stock firmware "services," but I would rather not count on finding them or noticing if their defaults change after the next automatic update. My favorite "opt-out" option is to install OpenWrt.

It is the case that a managed switch does not do a whole lot though. It is pretty much set it and forget it as darksky says.

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Best opt out is a firewall rule on your OpenWrt router :smiley:

config rule
  option src 'lan'
  option target 'REJECT'
  option name 'deny wan access to managed switch'
  option dest 'wan'
  list proto 'all'
  list src_ip '10.9.1.100'
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That is an excellent idea. In fact, I think it was one of your similar posts, darksky, that set the light bulb off in my head regarding what to do about my Canon printer that I wanted to have on my trusted home lan WiFi, but did not trust its firmware. A belated thank you for that.

As I recall, I blocked it with its mac address instead of its IP, but it does have a static IP assigned on my network, so a rule for either or both would work.

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Right now I think I have ordered all the devices :slight_smile:

Thank you for all the advices.

I understand the concept but I had never implemented one.

Since I'm using two omada APs for wifi what do you think about get an omada switch like TL-SG2008? The reason to think on it is that with Omada app I can get a quickly overview about the devices on the network and where the devices are connected to. There is any app or service that can get these kind of data from openwrt?

I would not do it myself. You have a perfectly good GS308T managed switch already, right? My GS308T works great with OpenWrt. I can't imagine why I would want to replace it with a TL-SG2008.

As for using Omada to monitor a home network...that is up to you. I find OpenWrt monitoring capability to be more than sufficient for my home network as it is. Once a switch is set up, it's pretty much set it and forget it. Same with a home network. Anything else is a hobby or interest in learning a new system, etc.

I already have the gs308t but haven't installed it yet. I'm waiting for the nanopi. It have already arrived at the country but will take some more days to arrive at home.

On the nanopi router running openwrt can I know if a device is connected to an AP or another? Is information passed through the network up to the router?

See for suggestion (and thread) here:

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No idea. I just log into my AP LuCi interfaces to see what devices are connected to an AP. The overview display on my main NanoPi R4S gateway shows every DHCP lease on the network too, which is helpful at times.

But you can't infer where each client is connected, can you?

I have just two AP's on my home network - it is easy enough for me to log into each AP and see what clients are connected to each AP.

Looks like fodiator has provided a link to a way to collect this information in a common location with OpenWrt. I've never tried to do this, and don't know how to do it myself.

Logging into a couple AP's has always been easy enough for me.

Your plan looks good to me, and looks a lot like my desired setup. I wanted to reach out because I'm wondering how you created the plots of wifi download speed over the floor plan?

I recognize the floor plan as being generated by Sweet Home 3D, but I am specifically interested in how you created the heat plots. Was it a manual process of importing data from an app and cross-referencing the timestamp with position, or is there some other software that helped?

I'm going to be moving soon, and I am thinking about how to evaluate any hardware needs in the new space.

I used that tool: https://github.com/jantman/python-wifi-survey-heatmap and yes the floor plan was generated by Sweet Home 3D :slight_smile:

In my option I don't think it worths the time. I prefer the method I did after. Choose some strategic points where I will use the devices and compare only these points using values. See here: Dumb AP around 50/60Eur - #59 by metropt

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Thanks, much appreciated. I have 2 WAC104 APs flashed with openwrt in my current place. One would have sufficed, except for one corner that experienced poor speeds. I don't really care about top of the line bandwidth, since I hardly ever download anything large enough to matter. What I do care about is large latency/jitter on the edges of the floor plan.

I was looking at the EAP615, but I'm uncertain if I really need the AX capability at the moment. I might compare with the EAP225 as well. I'm expecting to have separate router/ap devices.

I don't need at the moment also(I only have one device AX capable at home) but for the price diference I think it is future proof.

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The nanopi r4s arrived :slight_smile:

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