/etc/sysctl.conf

Hello,

I got 1000/1000mbps bidirectional/symmetric fiber WAN-connection.
x86_64 hardware (Qotom Q570G6):
2core/4thread Intel i7-6500u @ 3.1GHz boost
8GB RAM
SSD

Im running my clients through wireguard client to mullvad VPN provider which gives me full speed with overhead basically always.

I read this thread How to optimize throughput and TCP network efficiency and it got me thinking.

Im getting good speeds, but maybe it can improve?
Ive been reading everywhere that openwrt is "not made for x86" but more for less capable hardware.

However, i like openwrt so... yeah

Would it make sense to edit /etc/sysctl.conf to make better use of RAM / TCP buffers etc?
I switched from Asus 86u with asuswrt merlin to this routersetup, and i want optimal performance ofcourse, optimizing for many connections more then anything, sequential speeds im getting but maybe that can also improve.

Give me your thoughts please
Thank you

Your reasoning is not why (I've heard) people say that. It's because you could get more "mileage" from a full x86_64 machine by running a full distro (e.g. you enable routing when IPv4 Forwarding is enabled in sysctl).

Nonetheless, I don't see why you would need to edit the sysctrl much (maybe to allow more connections than ~16,000; but that's all I could imagine).

Are you trying to match the configs of a full distro or something?

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Only if that would improve things, otherwise its mute to do it.
I was just thinking with this hardware maybe theres something to do

Yeah, but there are static values set, they wont just increase if they are full, like TCP buffers, how do i even know if these values needs to be changed to take full advantage?
can u monitor the values u can set in sysctl.conf ?

OpenWrt is pretty much optimized for networking.
Altering some kernel parameters is unlikely to significantly improve your network performance.
If it were that simple, it would already be applied by default.

openwrt is specialized OS and optimized already.
monitor the system the usual way I would say, analyzing logs, (dmesg etc)
it's not a server system, if any of the additional components might need kernel parameters changes
it's documented.