Wired router for 1GB symmetric

Hi

I am looking for a well supported device for 1GB symmetric line with at least 4 lan ports in Europe.

Don't need wifi and would like to spend up to 100€

What's your advice?

Thanks

not that much has changed since then.

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https://www.ebay.de/itm/275937811217 or https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uAxe2pAUY50

make sure you buy the quad core (GX-415GA) version of the S920.

if you're OK with German: https://www.kuerbis.org/2021/03/hochverfuegbare-firewall-mit-thin-client-fujitsu-futro-s920-und-opnsense/

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But what minimum CPU and memory requirements should the router meet for my needs?

You could also get a bit powerful version S930 with GX-424CC procesor. With these you can probably use 1/1 Gbps line but dont hold me by my words. The cpu also has AES support if you need that. You only need to buy a riser and an compatible network card. I think intel is recomended for NIC. With this setup you are probably lower than 100€.

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the S920 pushes 6+gbit (not route!) in the test posted at the end of the YT video.
I see no reason why it wouldn't be able to do 1gbit.

but if the price diff's only 10€, or so, go for the S930.

for 1gibt, based on https://www.cpubenchmark.net/cpu_list.php, probably something above 1k CPU Mark.

the 415GA is 1.4k, a GX-412TC used in the SW302DA, with intel NICs is ~0.7k.
a J1900 mentioned at the end of https://youtu.be/Yq9NtTS90AE?t=782 is 1.1k.

as for memory, openwrt doesn't need much, 512MB and up.

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With Intel x520, quad 2.4GHz do ~5.7GBps nat with like 70% cpu usage .

If you're not planning to do anything CPU intensive, many of a huge number of mt7621-based routers are perfectly suited for PPPoE / NAT up to 1Gbit symmetric, thanks to their onboard network processing. See this link for the list of tested models and the list of others known not to work. The patch is now in mainline OpenWRT.

I use the edge/core routing model, where I terminate PPPoE and handle basic firewall policy and NAT at the edge with one of these (actually a Linksys EA7500v2*, which for some reason isn't listed there) , and then do final routing along with any processing, shaping, VPNs etc. on another machine on the internal network. Most people won't need to do anything like this, and NAT at the edge is enough.

(*Note, only buy a used model on ebay if the listing has a photo of the device's information plate and you can see that it's the correct supported version . The listing description and title are often incorrect.)

If you ARE planning to do any traffic shaping/processing, and/or VPN, note just being an intel/amd based processor isn't enough. Notably the AMD SOCs and Celeron/Atom-based boxes a lot of people recommend won't really let you crunch a gigabit. Read @slh's link above very carefully if this is the case.

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HI

Thanks for your help and information
I'm not running any task-intensive work, this is just for my family at home (4 to 6).
My ISP router will be in bridge mode on port 4 and I'll connect to the device this way.
All TV streams will be made on the ISP router.

Can this use case be archived on your listed device, mainly 1g/1g without issues?

Thanks

In some tests I did with a NanoPi R4S with OpenWrt 22.03.5, I was able to achieve ~940 Mbps from WAN<->LAN via iperf3 (two different PCs as iperf3 client and server, one connected on LAN and other on WAN, OpenWrt/R4S in the middle) . Only two cores reached an utilization of about 70%-80%, while other 4 cores remained at 0%. So I believe it should be OK for a 1Gbps symmetric line.

With a Wireguard VPN tunnel, I was able to achieve ~760~875Mbps also with the Nano Pi R4S.

But this is just basic routing/firewall (default config). If SQM/QoS is a requirement, than the results will be different, and a beefier CPU may be required.

----------------------------
iperf3 WAN <-> LAN
----------------------------

iperf3 Client: x64 PC running Windows 11 on LAN side (192.168.2.145)
iperf3 Server: Orange Pi 5 running DietPi on WAN side (192.168.1.151)
Router: NanoPi R4S running OpenWrt 22.03.5 (192.168.2.1)

D:\>iperf3 -c 192.168.1.151
Connecting to host 192.168.1.151, port 5201
[  4] local 192.168.2.145 port 60344 connected to 192.168.1.151 port 5201
[ ID] Interval           Transfer     Bandwidth
[  4]   0.00-1.00   sec   110 MBytes   918 Mbits/sec
[  4]   1.00-2.00   sec   113 MBytes   946 Mbits/sec
[  4]   2.00-3.00   sec   109 MBytes   913 Mbits/sec
[  4]   3.00-4.00   sec   113 MBytes   947 Mbits/sec
[  4]   4.00-5.00   sec   107 MBytes   896 Mbits/sec
[  4]   5.00-6.00   sec   113 MBytes   946 Mbits/sec
[  4]   6.00-7.00   sec   112 MBytes   935 Mbits/sec
[  4]   7.00-8.00   sec   113 MBytes   947 Mbits/sec
[  4]   8.00-9.00   sec   111 MBytes   932 Mbits/sec
[  4]   9.00-10.00  sec   113 MBytes   946 Mbits/sec
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
[ ID] Interval           Transfer     Bandwidth
[  4]   0.00-10.00  sec  1.09 GBytes   933 Mbits/sec                  sender
[  4]   0.00-10.00  sec  1.09 GBytes   933 Mbits/sec                  receiver

iperf Done.

----------------------------
OpenWrt CPU Load (R4S):
----------------------------
    0[||                                                    1.3%]   3[                                                       0.0%]
    1[                                                      0.0%]   4[|||||||||||                                           17.0%]
    2[                                                      0.0%]   5[||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||      81.3%]
  Mem[||||                                           64.9M/3.78G] Tasks: 21, 14 thr, 87 kthr; 1 running
  Swp[                                                     0K/0K] Load average: 0.04 0.02 0.00
                                                                  Uptime: 00:15:28

D:\>iperf3 -c 192.168.1.151 -R
Connecting to host 192.168.1.151, port 5201
Reverse mode, remote host 192.168.1.151 is sending
[  4] local 192.168.2.145 port 60346 connected to 192.168.1.151 port 5201
[ ID] Interval           Transfer     Bandwidth
[  4]   0.00-1.00   sec   109 MBytes   918 Mbits/sec
[  4]   1.00-2.00   sec   113 MBytes   949 Mbits/sec
[  4]   2.00-3.00   sec   113 MBytes   949 Mbits/sec
[  4]   3.00-4.00   sec   113 MBytes   944 Mbits/sec
[  4]   4.00-5.00   sec   113 MBytes   949 Mbits/sec
[  4]   5.00-6.00   sec   113 MBytes   949 Mbits/sec
[  4]   6.00-7.00   sec   113 MBytes   949 Mbits/sec
[  4]   7.00-8.00   sec   113 MBytes   949 Mbits/sec
[  4]   8.00-9.00   sec   113 MBytes   949 Mbits/sec
[  4]   9.00-10.00  sec   113 MBytes   949 Mbits/sec
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
[ ID] Interval           Transfer     Bandwidth       Retr
[  4]   0.00-10.00  sec  1.10 GBytes   947 Mbits/sec    0             sender
[  4]   0.00-10.00  sec  1.10 GBytes   946 Mbits/sec                  receiver

iperf Done.
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I have one of these in my amazon.es basket :slight_smile:
Edit: I'm deciding if I spend 130€ or get a cheaper device, but I know I'll sacrifice some performance.

I wouldn't...

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It should be just fine. Here's my test with an early build. There are many other user tests in that page. Be sure to read the top of that thread for full information about what this does; it also contains the list of devices known NOT to work. (I was disappointed to see the Mikrotik hEX on that list, it's an otherwise nice cost-effective device that's easy to get in Europe, but they appear to have made a factory change that cripples it for this purpose.)

If you find what you're sure is a supported model in a combined wifi/wired router, obviously you can just leave the wifi turned off if you don't need it. Just remember to turn on "Hardware Flow Offloading" under Firewall/General Settings, where you set up masquerading and NAT for your WAN interface.

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(By the way, before that I used a Raspberry Pi 4B running OpenWRT for about 6 months as my main all-purpose router. It works amazingly well with plenty of CPU to spare, and they're finally available again. You just need to spend another €10 or so for a good Realtek-based USB3 adapter, since it only has one ethernet port. I used a Vantec dual-ethernet adapter for a total of 3 interfaces, but that was when they charged a reasonable price for them. For some reason they're overpriced now, almost cost as much as the Pi itself.)