Should I install OpenWrt?

Good day everyone. Tell me please. Do I need to install OpenWRT on my Netgear WNDR3800? I don't know much about all this. But the last microcode update for WNDR3800 was in 2017. Is my router vulnerable and is it worth changing the firmware to OpenWRT to improve security? Or am I too worried about this?
Thanks in advance for any answers. I understand that I look stupid on this forum. But this question worries me very much.

Generally the linux kernel on these original firmwares are even older, a lot older than 2017. Probably from the first 10years of the millennia.
And these old firmwares in home routers are a known settlement for DDoS bots living nicely and actually kicking out other DDoS bots trying to get a home in these old home routers.

But if you want a new router in general or want a go on OpenWRT is up to you.
There are a steep learning curve for OpenWRT but how steep also depends how complex home network you have.

The real benefit with OpenWRT is that bugs get tracked, kernels are updated and security holes gets taken care off pretty fast and transparent.
These bugs rarely gets handled by factory firmwares regardless of updates.

2 Likes

I would yes. Just flash:
https://downloads.openwrt.org/releases/19.07.7/targets/ath79/generic/openwrt-19.07.7-ath79-generic-netgear_wndr3800-squashfs-factory.img

I partially agree with this. If your network needs are fairly basic, the default configuration might just work for you right away, except for the need to set your SSID and password (and enable wifi). OpenWrt can be pretty simple if you're not doing any significant customization. If you do need a setup with a bit of customization, it can be a bit of effort to learn how OpenWrt does certain things -- but again, some things are conceptually more-or-less the same as how you would setup the same features in stock firmware. If you're digging deeper and making a truly complex setup, you'll need to learn a lot about OpenWrt, but then again, usually the need for such complex networking also comes with enough general experience that it would be more akin to a software engineer learning a new programming language (vs a software engineer taking up mechanical engineering).

1 Like