Recommend quad-core router that can push gigabit speeds

According to an internal internet pic of a SG125, it looks like an M.2 SATA 2242 slot on the 105/115/125/135 Rev 3 ...

Yep, that's the one. Note the above-mentioned tamper-evident sealing very tastefully done as a cute little blob of white plastic. :smile:

Also according to the doc posted above v3 also switched from Atom to ApolloLake

Apollo Lake is the generation ... the 105/115/125/135 Rev 3 are still out-of-order-execution Atom chips, the x5-E3930/x5-E3940/x7-E3950.

They seem like lovely pieces of hardware, but please don't expect more than they can deliver.

At least they shouldn't be subject to the previous-generation Atom hardware bug that might afflict the Rev 2 models.

I'm using netgear wc7600 with atom c2554 without problem for like 4 years, is fast and not much power hungry

Thanks for clarifying!

After reading through, I'm rethinking if something like a Protectli might be good choice. Anybody care to speak more about their experience running a Protectli? There's been lots of mention of Sophos. Sophos seems well suited for deep packet inspection and SSL work, but absent these tasks will there be a clear performance advantage over something like a Protectli for a home network with 10 wired clients plus 5 or so wireless clients?

The suggestions about Sophos are more about their solid purpose built x86_64 hardware (second hand) with OpenWrt, than their firmware.

My understanding is that the Sophos hardwear is going to be more capable than something like a Protectli. But is that something that will translate into noticeably improved 1GB performance on a home network?

Protectli seems like it will play nice with opensource firmware like Openwrt. I'm wondering if Sophos might have better hardwear overall but be less opensource friendly in some ways. Love to hear any views people have or if I have mistaken idea about anything.

is that a question, or a statement ?

I edited my post to hopefully make it more understandable.

This month, I have bought two Beelink U59 Pro (Intel N5105, 16 GB RAM and 2 Ethernet Gigabit port) for 185 euros each. I use one on a recently installed Gigabit link. It runs a Wireguard VPN to a commercial VPN provider and SQM Cake. Electric consumption is between 9 W (almost idle) and 18 W (850 mbps download through VPN). OpenWRT installation was super easy on a USB Key.

@DeepAnger

This sounds great. Thanks for the feedback on Beelink.

You can find a used gigabit capable x86 device on eBay for ~$25, and up, if gigabit NATing is your only requirement.
Prices obviously vary from day to day, since these devices are available in limited numbers.

Most of the Sophos' we're talking about, at least up to [S|X]G115 rev 3, will not be more capable than a recent Protectli. Rather less so, in fact, except perhaps at the very lowest end of the Protectli range. Their advantage is that they're fully configured proven hardware that can be found inexpensively on the used market from time to time; as little as $100US or less shipped for those models, and at the higher end (rev 3 really) they're good enough for almost anything you're likely to need for a gigabit connection. I suggest you compare specs and evaluate your processing needs.

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@Cheddoleum

Thanks for clarifying this. Much appreciated

I do not own one, however this brand is very famous in pfSense/OPNsense community, so I believe that should work even better with OpenWrt.

I have MinisForum GK41 which is Celeron J4125 with dual gigabit, it also works well (the wifi card can be ignored, it's supported under OpenWrt however the stability is poor)

Both Sophos and Protectli have multiple models, current and past. So you really can't generalize. Current Protectli lineup has models that run on anything from Intel Celeron to Intel Core i7 and have Gigabit or 2.5 Gbit NICs. Current Sophos lineup is even wider; it goes from desktop models with Intel Atom to rack-mounted ones with Intel Xeon and 10 Gbps SFP slots. You really need to compare specific models.

5 posts were split to a new topic: Hardware suggestions needed for a professional gamer