Any wired routers with more than 5 LAN ports that run OpenWrt well?

#21

For my use case that $30 Zyxel would be plenty, all I need is proper VLAN support. In fact, I think even a switch that doesn't strip VLAN tags would be fine, if it makes it to my ERX. I understand the separation of VLANs in the switch, but not really running a highly secure environment here.
As for the rb493g, that should be enough too for a 100Mbps internet connection, it seems to be able to do at least that and more.

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#22

You may run into problems if you start to run SQM of any sort. A 720 MHz MIPS SoC running with 128 MB of RAM tops out not far above that.

I'd also pay attention to the notes on VLANs on the device page and see if they apply to you.

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#23

@dlakelan
I'd take Vitesse/Microsemi/Broadcom any day over Realtek which GS1900 uses but given the price it's not a bad deal despite that :wink:
Can't confirm GS1920 but GS1910 uses Vitesse hardware at least and given the featureset of the GS1920 I'd guess they're using something else than Realtek.

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#24

Take a look at the SG-108e from tp-link, it's another stripped down web-managed switch. I run one on a desk to connect my main PC, a wireless AP, a printer, an espressobin, and a SIP ATA to a LAG group that connects to my main switch. This ensures that no one device can saturate the link. I also run one on my kid's desk to connect their two linux PCs and another AP back to my main switch. It has very basic DSCP based QoS (ie. on or off) and supports VLANs and static LAG groups. It's $28.50 on Amazon at the moment. The latest versions (v3 and v4) are acceptable, earlier versions had issues. Immediately upgrade the firmware on removing it from the box.

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#25

Yeah, and it does work fine under what I'd call demanding home / home-office usage: gigabit WAN, 3 VLANs, LACP, static LAG over dual links to a desk full of networked junk, bandwidth limiting on several ports, storm control, IGMP snooping + querying for games etc, QoS to ensure smooth VOIP calls and kids games and streaming... It's a lot of switch for $100

The one thing I'd like in a switch that it doesn't do is rule based DSCP tagging. Even the 1920 doesn't seem to have this kind of rule based tagging. It seems like the cisco SG350 allows this kind of thing in QoS advanced mode. I'm not sure if the 300 series does or not. It's not a must have feature, and you can work around it quite a bit making good use of OpenWrt based routers as access points + wired access points for low bandwidth high priority devices (like phones).

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#26

The turris MOX offers a special module with an 8 port switch, see MOX-E (Super Ethernet) on https://mox.turris.cz/en/overview/ according to their configurator one might be able to attach up to three MOX-E modules to a MOX-A basis, which if true would give you 24 ports, but I believe the groups of 8 would only talk to each other over a single port, so this would not be equal to having 24 ports on the same switch-backplane.

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#27

Wow, that looks pretty cool. Hopefully affordable in the US.

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#28

Can OpenWRT be installed on Cisco/Linksys SG300 or SF300 switches?

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#29

No, switches would be connected to a router

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#30

Something like the Cisco RV325 could be interesting if it ran OpenWRT.

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#31

OpenWRT does a fair job supporting some built in L2 switches on OpenWRT routers, but i have not seen it exposing the per-port connected MAC addresses via LUCI, even though my box L2 switch does show MAC addresses via swconfig.

LAN ports on OpenWRT do not support well enough diagnostics ("what the heck is connected where"). Aka: I'd suggest you use LAN switches that provide this per-MAC-address diagnostics and keep OpenWRT routers focus on what it does best: connect to LAN switches and WAN ports. Would be surprised if you then would still need 8 or more ports on the OpenWRT router.

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