After enabling the mesh11s network, the network to the router becomes unstable, ping is lost or it is very high

After enabling the mesh network, the network to the router becomes unstable, ping is lost or it is very high

uci del wireless.radio0.disabled
uci set wireless.wifinet2=wifi-iface
uci set wireless.wifinet2.device='radio0'
uci set wireless.wifinet2.mode='mesh'
uci set wireless.wifinet2.encryption='sae'
uci set wireless.wifinet2.mesh_id='80211s2gnetwork'
uci set wireless.wifinet2.mesh_fwding='1'
uci set wireless.wifinet2.mesh_rssi_threshold='0'
uci set wireless.wifinet2.key='80211s2gpassword'
uci set wireless.wifinet2.network='lan'

Why does this happen?

logs:

Thu Jun 13 18:26:39 2024 daemon.notice hostapd: phy0-ap0: BEACON-REQ-TX-STATUS b8:ea:98:9d:b2:41 13 ack=0
Thu Jun 13 18:26:39 2024 kern.warn kernel: [11788.946179] br-lan: received packet on wan with own address as source address (addr:28:d1:27:bd:be:f1, vlan:0)
Thu Jun 13 18:26:39 2024 kern.warn kernel: [11788.963558] br-lan: received packet on phy0-mesh0 with own address as source address (addr:28:d1:27:bd:be:f1, vlan:0)
Thu Jun 13 18:26:40 2024 kern.warn kernel: [11788.976582] br-lan: received packet on phy0-mesh0 with own address as source address (addr:28:d1:27:bd:be:f1, vlan:0)
Thu Jun 13 18:26:40 2024 kern.warn kernel: [11788.985556] br-lan: received packet on wan with own address as source address (addr:28:d1:27:bd:be:f1, vlan:0)
Thu Jun 13 18:26:40 2024 kern.warn kernel: [11788.997385] br-lan: received packet on phy0-mesh0 with own address as source address (addr:28:d1:27:bd:be:f1, vlan:0)
Thu Jun 13 18:26:40 2024 kern.warn kernel: [11789.009459] br-lan: received packet on phy0-mesh0 with own address as source address (addr:28:d1:27:bd:be:f1, vlan:0)
Thu Jun 13 18:26:40 2024 kern.warn kernel: [11789.038249] br-lan: received packet on wan with own address as source address (addr:28:d1:27:bd:be:f1, vlan:0)
Thu Jun 13 18:26:40 2024 kern.warn kernel: [11789.071829] br-lan: received packet on phy0-mesh0 with own address as source address (addr:28:d1:27:bd:be:f1, vlan:0)
Thu Jun 13 18:26:40 2024 kern.warn kernel: [11789.083384] br-lan: received packet on phy0-mesh0 with own address as source address (addr:28:d1:27:bd:be:f1, vlan:0)
Thu Jun 13 18:26:44 2024 kern.warn kernel: [11793.492708] net_ratelimit: 171 callbacks suppressed
Thu Jun 13 18:26:44 2024 kern.warn kernel: [11793.492743] br-lan: received packet on wan with own address as source address (addr:28:d1:27:bd:be:f1, vlan:0)
Thu Jun 13 18:26:44 2024 kern.warn kernel: [11793.533064] br-lan: received packet on wan with own address as source address (addr:28:d1:27:bd:be:f1, vlan:0)
Thu Jun 13 18:26:44 2024 kern.warn kernel: [11793.543330] br-lan: received packet on wan with own address as source address (addr:28:d1:27:bd:be:f1, vlan:0)
Thu Jun 13 18:26:44 2024 kern.warn kernel: [11793.553438] br-lan: received packet on wan with own address as source address (addr:28:d1:27:bd:be:f1, vlan:0)
Thu Jun 13 18:26:44 2024 kern.warn kernel: [11793.569940] br-lan: received packet on wan with own address as source address (addr:28:d1:27:bd:be:f1, vlan:0)
Thu Jun 13 18:26:44 2024 kern.warn kernel: [11793.598368] br-lan: received packet on wan with own address as source address (addr:28:d1:27:bd:be:f1, vlan:0)
Thu Jun 13 18:26:44 2024 kern.warn kernel: [11793.608516] br-lan: received packet on wan with own address as source address (addr:28:d1:27:bd:be:f1, vlan:0)
Thu Jun 13 18:26:44 2024 kern.warn kernel: [11793.608664] br-lan: received packet on wan with own address as source address (addr:28:d1:27:bd:be:f1, vlan:0)
Thu Jun 13 18:26:44 2024 kern.warn kernel: [11793.618690] br-lan: received packet on wan with own address as source address (addr:28:d1:27:bd:be:f1, vlan:0)
Thu Jun 13 18:26:44 2024 kern.warn kernel: [11793.628847] br-lan: received packet on wan with own address as source address (addr:28:d1:27:bd:be:f1, vlan:0)
Thu Jun 13 18:26:50 2024 kern.warn kernel: [11799.228459] net_ratelimit: 107 callbacks suppressed
Thu Jun 13 18:26:50 2024 kern.warn kernel: [11799.228494] br-lan: received packet on wan with own address as source address (addr:28:d1:27:bd:be:f1, vlan:0)
Thu Jun 13 18:26:50 2024 kern.warn kernel: [11799.256719] br-lan: received packet on wan with own address as source address (addr:28:d1:27:bd:be:f1, vlan:0)
Thu Jun 13 18:26:50 2024 kern.warn kernel: [11799.343411] br-lan: received packet on wan with own address as source address (addr:28:d1:27:bd:be:f1, vlan:0)
Thu Jun 13 18:26:50 2024 kern.warn kernel: [11799.387013] br-lan: received packet on phy0-mesh0 with own address as source address (addr:28:d1:27:bd:be:f1, vlan:0)
Thu Jun 13 18:26:50 2024 kern.warn kernel: [11799.403273] br-lan: received packet on phy0-mesh0 with own address as source address (addr:28:d1:27:bd:be:f1, vlan:0)
Thu Jun 13 18:26:50 2024 kern.warn kernel: [11799.425757] br-lan: received packet on phy0-mesh0 with own address as source address (addr:28:d1:27:bd:be:f1, vlan:0)
Thu Jun 13 18:26:50 2024 kern.warn kernel: [11799.436725] br-lan: received packet on phy0-mesh0 with own address as source address (addr:28:d1:27:bd:be:f1, vlan:0)
Thu Jun 13 18:26:50 2024 kern.warn kernel: [11799.447465] br-lan: received packet on phy0-mesh0 with own address as source address (addr:28:d1:27:bd:be:f1, vlan:0)
Thu Jun 13 18:26:50 2024 kern.warn kernel: [11799.459206] br-lan: received packet on phy0-mesh0 with own address as source address (addr:28:d1:27:bd:be:f1, vlan:0)
Thu Jun 13 18:26:50 2024 kern.warn kernel: [11799.470013] br-lan: received packet on phy0-mesh0 with own address as source address (addr:28:d1:27:bd:be:f1, vlan:0)
Thu Jun 13 18:26:50 2024 daemon.notice hostapd: phy0-ap0: BEACON-REQ-TX-STATUS b8:ea:98:9d:b2:41 14 ack=0
Thu Jun 13 18:26:50 2024 daemon.notice hostapd: phy0-ap0: BEACON-REQ-TX-STATUS b8:ea:98:9d:b2:41 15 ack=0
Thu Jun 13 18:26:50 2024 daemon.notice hostapd: phy0-ap0: BEACON-REQ-TX-STATUS b8:ea:98:9d:b2:41 16 ack=0

Because you have a bridge loop as indicated by:

You have not given any details about the mesh network you are trying to create.
Are you sure you want a mesh network?

Have you read the documentation for "mesh11s" networks?
https://openwrt.org/docs/guide-user/network/wifi/mesh/mesh11sd#s_-_the_mesh11sd_project

Are you aware that vlan trunking is not directly supported over wireless?

1 Like

Yes, I really need an 802.11s network (currently I have 802.11r and 802.11k (dawn and usteer) configured and I’m not happy with that

I set it up according to the instructions from here https://bmaupin.github.io/wiki/other/openwrt/openwrt-80211s.html

Mesh 802.11s needs to work
There are three devices

  • Xiaomi 4A Gigabyte Edition (R3Gv2/R4A)
  • Xiaomi 4A Gigabyte Edition v2 (RB02/AC1200)
  • D-Team Newifi D2

According to the instructions, as soon as I create a WiFi network with the mesh network type, I turn it on (points 4.7 and 4.8 in the instructions), almost immediately the routers get an unstable LAN network

802.11r and 802.11k have nothing whatsoever to do with mesh networking.

A ask the question again:
Are you sure you want a mesh network?

A mesh network provides a "backhaul" for use in connecting numerous router type devices together wirelessly. Normal user devices (phones, tablets, laptops, desktops) CANNOT directly connect to a mesh backhaul. Instead these devices connect to an access point or mesh gateway.

Quoting the link I posted:

WARNING Are you sure you want a mesh?

If you are looking for a solution to enable your user devices to seamlessly roam from one access point to another in your home, YOU ARE NOT LOOKING FOR A MESH.

The link you posted is VERY outdated, and as you found, does not work.
Please try reading the OpenWrt user guide in my link.

I just need one WiFi network, not fast switching/roaming, but just one network for my wireless devices

Do you mean you want a single local area network with its own ip subnet with multiple access points all with the same SSID?

Are your access points connected together with ethernet cables?

Yes, the devices are connected to each other using an Ethernet cable.

I need the clients to work on the same WiFi network (with the same name) and not switch when moving from one zone to another, as is done in 802.11r

I don’t know how this is implemented in Ubiquiti, but it works there; when switching a smartphone between access points, not a single frame is lost via video communication, but on 802.11r this is noticeable and even icmp packets are lost

THEN YOU DO NOT WANT A MESH NETWORK.

You did not read any of the documentation in my link did you....

If coverage is good enough to do that then you do not need any extra access points.

You just said you do not want to switch between access points.... But if they all have the same ssid (name), how do you know if a switch has taken place?

If you want to fix your problem, ie:

Remove all traces of mesh from your wireless config, remove mesh11sd if you have installed it, then reboot.

As @bluewavenet has stated, you do not want 802.11s/mesh, and you should disable it entirely.

  • Attempting to use both wired and wireless backhaul (i.e. 802.11s) will cause switching loops, causing your network to become unstable. Only one backhaul connection is allowed.
  • The wired connections you already have between your APs will be more reliable and faster than a wireless backhaul, so forget about mesh entirely.

Next, you said you are using 802.11k and 802.11r

  • My recommendation is to disable 802.11k/r/v (you didn't mention anything about v, but it should also be off) unless you have a demonstrated need for the potential improvements. In many cases, these actually cause more problems than they solve, so it is necessary to first optimize your system and then, only if needed, experiment with these standards.

Onto roaming optimization...

  • Roaming is a client side operation. The APs have little or nothing to do with the process, but you can configure your APs such that it encourages the clients to roam at the right time/place.
  • Each of your APs must be set using the same SSID + encryption type + passphrase.
  • Neighboring APs should use different and non-overlapping channels. To make this work, you will probably want to stick to 20MHz channels on 2.4G and 40MHz channels on 5G. You can see the channels and their overlaps here.
  • Power levels should be reduced to the lowest possible setting that still covers the desired area. The idea is to completely cover the desired area for one AP while minimizing the overlap with the next AP. This will result in the client device roaming appropraitely as it leaves the coverage area of one AP and moves into the coverage of another AP. If the overlap is too big, the client will not be complelled to roam.

This video explains it very well. It deals with Unifi, but the concepts apply to all wifi APs.

I read the documentation, but it’s not entirely clear the purpose of mesh11s (802.11s) and what was created in general

Do I understand correctly that a mesh point created on a router is a kind of analogue of uplink ports on a router, that is, replacing Ethernet? using it as a transit?

Additional points are needed, 3 of my apartments (more than 160 square meters) + in the area near the house

for 802.11r you can see auth....=ft in the logs

I already did this, rolled back all the changes

Should my access points be on different channels? (I know about non-overlapping 1, 6, 11 for 2.4 gHz, and for 5 gHz I’m now reading about what is available in my country)

I also took into account the location and signal strength when designing my home WiFi network

Ideally, yes. Most important, though, is that the neighboring APs are non-overlapping to the best of your ability. Think about the physical layout and then map out your channels to ensure that they're non-overlapping. If you have more than 3 APs, you'll need to repeat 2.4G channels, so just try to make those as far apart from each other as possible.

Good! This will help a lot.

I still don’t understand the purpose of 802.11s
This is in order to use WiFi as a backbone channel for points that do not have the opportunity to connect via cable.

Yes. It is a 'smart' wireless backhaul technology. It's not usually necessary if you have wired available to you.

From the beginning of the documentation:

What is a Mesh?

A mesh network is a multi point to multi point layer 2 mac-routing backhaul used to interconnect mesh peers. Mesh peers are generally non-user devices, such as routers, access points, CPEs etc..

A normal user device, such as a phone, tablet, laptop etc., cannot connect to a mesh network. Instead, connection is achieved via a mesh gateway, a special type of mesh peer.

Perhaps something is lost in translation...

Yes. The entire mesh, consisting of numerous mesh nodes (or points), is more like a virtual unmanaged switch with "invisible" ethernet cables.

Thank you, now the questions are gone
I know where to use a mesh network (there is one place where it is difficult to run a cable, I will use this technology)